Democrats have reversed the partisan imbalance on the federal appeals courts that long favored conservatives, a little-noticed shift with far-reaching consequences for the law and President Obama’s legacy.

For the first time in more than a decade, judges appointed by Democratic presidents considerably outnumber judges appointed by Republican presidents. The Democrats’ advantage has only grown since late last year when they stripped Republicans of their ability to filibuster the president’s nominees.

Democratic appointees who hear cases full time now hold a majority of seats on nine of the 13 United States Courts of Appeals. When Mr. Obama took office, only one of those courts had more full-time judges nominated by a Democrat.

Baldwin Park School Police Department: 3 M16 assault rifles

Kern High School District Police: 30 magazine pouches for M4 assault rifle ammunition

Los Angeles School Police Department: 61 M16 assault rifles, 3 M79 grenade launchers, 1 mine-resistant vehicle

Oakland Unified School Police: utility truck

San Diego Unified Schools Police: 1 mine-resistant vehicle

Apparently it is illegal to desecrate a venerated object in Pennsylvania. So…religion trumps free speech…and the right to be a Douchebag?

  • The New York Times Book Review announced a redesign to its bestsellers lists that will see the introduction of 12 new monthly charts.
  • The new lists include Travel, Humor, Family, Relationships, and Animals. In addition, on a rotating basis, the Book Review will also publish in print lists that were previously online exclusives—Politics, Manga, Graphic Novels, Food and Fitness.

Save the Internet

rynthetyn:

image

The Internet that you know and love is about the free exchange of information without censorship. If Internet providers have their way, that will end and providers will be able to slow down sites unless site owners pay for full speed. Join us in fighting for Net Neutrality. Tell Congress, the FCC, and the White House to keep the Internet equal.

onaissues:

Today, Netflix, Etsy, Kickstarter, Meetup, reddit, Upworthy, Vimeo, WordPress and a number of other websites are participating in Internet Slowdown Day. While the internet isn’t really slowing down, the websites are mimicking what would happen if it did, by placing spinning pinwheel loading images on their sites to raise awareness about the fight for net neutrality.
NPR provides a quick review of the issue: 

What is net neutrality all about?
The principle generally means that content isn’t prioritized above others, so that a user can go where he wants and do what he wants on the Internet without the interference of his broadband provider. Supporters of net neutrality protections say that without the rules, Internet service providers like Comcast and Time Warner will have economic incentives to charge content providers, such as Netflix, for “faster lanes” to get to you, the consumer. And that Netflix will have to pay up, because regulations are needed to say, “Comcast, you can’t do that.”
…
What can I do if I want to weigh in?
Already, more than one million comments were sent into the FCC about this issue, the most of any rule-making measure in the agency’s history. The vast majority of the comments supported stricter enforcement of net neutrality.
You can still comment. Monday is the last day the public can weigh in on the process by submitting comments to the commission.

Read more: Your Favorite Sites Will ‘Slow Down’ Today, For A Cause : All Tech Considered : NPR

onaissues:

Today, Netflix, Etsy, Kickstarter, Meetup, reddit, Upworthy, Vimeo, WordPress and a number of other websites are participating in Internet Slowdown Day. While the internet isn’t really slowing down, the websites are mimicking what would happen if it did, by placing spinning pinwheel loading images on their sites to raise awareness about the fight for net neutrality.

NPR provides a quick review of the issue: 

What is net neutrality all about?

The principle generally means that content isn’t prioritized above others, so that a user can go where he wants and do what he wants on the Internet without the interference of his broadband provider. Supporters of net neutrality protections say that without the rules, Internet service providers like Comcast and Time Warner will have economic incentives to charge content providers, such as Netflix, for “faster lanes” to get to you, the consumer. And that Netflix will have to pay up, because regulations are needed to say, “Comcast, you can’t do that.”

What can I do if I want to weigh in?

Already, more than one million comments were sent into the FCC about this issue, the most of any rule-making measure in the agency’s history. The vast majority of the comments supported stricter enforcement of net neutrality.

You can still comment. Monday is the last day the public can weigh in on the process by submitting comments to the commission.

Read more: Your Favorite Sites Will ‘Slow Down’ Today, For A Cause : All Tech Considered : NPR

Battle for the Internet

Battle for the Internet

(Source: battleforthenet.com, via singularityblues)